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? >> guest: there was a common law right in england allowing people to have firearms for self-defense and other purposes issue and that right, common law right, traveled across the ocean with the colonists, and they needed the guns here, whereas in england, mostly, they did not. people soon came to have the facility, and knowledge of firearms, and, of course, as we all know, it produced the results of victory against the most powerful military country in the world at the time in the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and, again, people have hazy views on history, and, you know, it comes from movies or tv a lot of the time. when we had the revolutionary period, what was the role of guns in these militias or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteer
of products who are more agile than laws, it can take decades to pass a good law, we saw those in changes of health care, what year were we starting to talk about revising our health care policies, i think it was 93 and it was 2008 before there was passage of a law so it can take decades and dozens of years, but if we ask for safer products, the market can turn on a dime. in 2007-2008, everyone started talking about bpa in plastics, by 2009, bpa-free plastics were everywhere, so can, not cancer is getting bpa out of food cans and they chased a huge success this year when campbell's soup said we're going to take the bpa out, we're waiting for a timeline from them and waiting for them to replace bpa with something safer, taking that first step was huge, even more significant perhaps is the campaign for safe cosmetics which has been around for about 10 years saying that -- getting johnson & jn -- johnson saying we're going to get carcinogens first out of our baby products across the whole world and that's really significant because they found formaldehyde in baby's johnson shampoo a few yea
last week in connecticut. but gun advocates are pitching new state laws that allow teachers to carry concealed weapons to school, and one state, virginia, is considering a bill to require teachers to carry weapons to work. president obama promised to make gun control a central issue for his next term. vice president joe biden is leading the administration effort to limit gun violence. early next month biden will deliver a set of specific legislative proposals for dollars tightening gun laws. so, congresswoman norton are guns in schools the answer? >> oh, bonnie. our country is in for another failing grade on guns if our best answer is guns in the schools. our best answer is to new town. >> i own guns. i'm generally skeptical of gun control but i'm not sure i'm ready to turn all american schools in to armed camps. >> absolutely not. in china the same day as newtown shooting there was man with a knife that entered a school. nobody was killed. this seems to imply the opposite. that guns out of schools is actual answer. >> i think guns in the hands of the right people or right person cou
asbin our gift to you on forbes on fox. a holy war over the health care of the law. little sisters may be bolting out of the united states because of the the new law is forcing them to provide insurance can contraception and if they don't get exceptions, they will have to pony up big fines. welcome to forbes on fox and we'll go with steve forbes and rick unger and elizabeth mcdonald and victoria and steve and rich. >> what do you think? >> jobs are going to be destroid even if they don't go overseas. health care costs are goi up. obama care is increasing alert . insurers have to take all comers and that will put a strain on it and mandates, consumers may not want them and politicians say you must have them and insurance costs are going up and we the people will be losers. >>> and the hobby lobby face a fine 1. 5 million if they don't dohat the government said they have to do via the health care law. >> i was corrected. 1.3 million a day. that is the daily fine they have to pay. >> let's make an important distunction we are notuve for dinner bets. mipemine is open for the anybody who do
the potentially dangerous people are, but we often, because the way the laws are written in most states, we can't do anything until they actually act. until they've actually committed a crime. >> paul: well, explain that. why to we have to wait if police departments and others know? when you say the law, the way the laws are written, how does that work? or in this case, not work? >> well, these are state laws so they vary from state to state. connecticut, as an example, has among the most stringent, restrictive commitment laws so the only way you can get somebody treated in connecticut is if they are overtly a danger to themselves or others. you can't treat them because they are potentially, because they have exhibited dangerous, dangerous behavior in the past. you have to wait until they actually do something. they also, connecticut's a good example of one of only six states that does not have assistant outpatient treatment. which means you can treat the person living in the community on the condition they can live in the community on condition that they take the medication. connecticut doesn'
raped and beaten on a moving city bus last weekend. protesters demanding changes to india's laws regarding rape saying women are not safe in new delhi and other cities in india. >>> a former marine spent more than four months at a mexican prison is free and heading home to florida. john hammer locked up in august on weapons charges. his family says he was physically abused in custody. threatened. chained to a bed, and never saw a judge. u.s. lawmakers and diplomats got involved on hammer's behalf and convinced mexican authorities to release him. >>> we'll talk more than in a moment. first a serious subject. this hour we take a tough look at the gun control debate and how much mental health may play a role, and if we can identify the next shooter before he takes a shot. first, we'd like to take a moment. a reminder of what is at stake here. today marked the final three funerals of the victims of the newtown, connecticut, shooting, and we've already buried six educators and 17 children. people stolen from their friends, from their family, from all of us. this is ana grace marquez,
and beaten on a moving city bus last weekend. protesters demanding changes to india's laws regarding rape saying women are not safe in new delhi and other cities in india. >>> a former marine spent more than four months at a mexican prison is free and heading home to florida. john hammer locked up in august on weapons charges. his family says he was physically abused in custody. threatened. chained to a bed, and never saw a judge. u.s. lawmakers and diplomats got involved on hammer's behalf and convinced mexican authorities to release him. woo will take a tough look at the gun control debate. first, a moment. a reminder of what is at stake. today mark the final three funerals. this is anna marquez-greenee, and emilie, who was bright and loving. josephine grace gay, who just celebrated her seventh birthday, and emilie alice parker, who was bright, creative and very loving. so let's have a conversation. it will probably make you angry. now, being angry is not a bad thing. it means this matters to you. gun control, in fact, that phrase alone may enrage some people. how about gun rights? this
bpa, it would set a precedent for other laws and market based changes that could have a big domino effect on our exposures, especially to endocrine disrupting compounds, you go back to standard you may have used in college, i did when i didn't have any money was to soak the beans, it's way cheaper, avoids canned food exposure, also to go with frozen or fresh vegetables if you can rather than cans, to choose stainless steel water bottles and other alternatives for baby bottles if you have young children and to change markets and to change laws because we know there are a lot of inequities that shapes who has access to healthy foods and fresh fruits,, we need to change some laws that these canned foods are safer, and more foods are available. we've gone into a can of corn, i don't know if you got that, we dove into this can of corn to talk about the bpa act, from representative ann marky from the house and senator from the senate, and this bans [inaudible] food and beverage containers, from infant and toddlers food, from everything, from adults, pregnant women, some important popula
to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammogram of average risk, so recommended that women start mammography at age ao where the benefits really out weigh the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care providers, but recent rese
that's prepared by the department in connection with law enforcement on criminal matters in relationship to second amendment activities. and the commission is responsible for looking at that report and reviewing it for compliance and signing off on it. so let you know that happened. >> thank you very much, commissioner kingsley. commissioner loftus. >> yes, i just had a couple things. i think we talked a lot about the bravery and heroism and the crying, especially on my part, around officer gritch and cloud and thanks, commissioner mazzucco. i think it's important, i said it then, we often talk about what's wrong with the department and that's definitely a role we have and something we have to do, but it's important to talk just as much about what's right with the department and to be present when the officers were recounting finding this baby that wasn't raining and it was raining at 2:00 am and going under a muni stop, i'm sure you all have stories like this, all the 2,000 officers that we don't see, have these stories where you are called for this service. a lot of
that will become law. yes, it is a tough vote, a very complicated, complex issue. it is something that many of us had been fighting for in the particulars of this and in personal lives as well. it was a very high priority for us. let's just say money. big money out there on the sides of those who would not be opposed. by the way, i do not paint all hunters with the same brush. i think this gives hunters a bad name. it is undeserved. many of them think it should be banned and that is what i am so proud that we are taking that view to make that distinction. there were no prospects of success and we one of the members to be here to continue to make about fight so that when there was a prospect of success they would be here rather than being cleared out by the nra. we saw that in 1994 when we were cleared out. >> let me add to that. one of my jobs is the job of chief deputy whip. back in that time, we had to vote to pass sensible gun legislation through the house, but when the senate said they could not do 60 votes, the leader made the decision that it really was not the thing to do at that time when
. >> politicians pass laws for gun-free school zones, and in doing so, they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. >> do you personally believe, congressman, that gun-free school zones have been invitations to mayhem and that the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun? >> well, i think that when you look at school safety, you've got to put armed guards into the equation. i've made it clear that it should not be a mandatory law that every school has there. there should be local choice but absolutely, i believe that protecting our children with an armed guard who is trained is an important part of the equation. we have two-thirds of our schools or, excuse me, one-third of our schools in america right now with an armed off-duty police officer or resource officer. if you have a choice of sending your child to a school that has that type of protection versus not, i think most people in america would say, let's go to what would be the school that invests in that type of safety and security. >> so when
think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's up to 2004 shows it had no effect. >> in april 1968, i was in ebenezer baptist church in atlant
party tax collection and the legislation before you amend it's the city's parking enforce law under city and tax code by reducing the bonding requirement for operator that is have a strong tax compliance and simplifying bond categorized and clarifying assurities under the law and how administrative citations are handled and clarifies requirements for government emit indictee when they operate a location for themselves. and the s ta reviewed the reaction and had no concerns and -- supported the legislation which came before the bulletin and finances committee i would like to thank the treasure of city of san francisco and his staff for working with my office specifically with seela in my office as well as gene and aleck alexander from the city attorney's office and i so i asks for your support of this ordinance. >> colleagues with ecan we take this item same time same call. >> this item is passed item 12. >>> >>> item 12 is finding the -- monitoring and reporting program relating to the fund of bridge project in aal a immediatee county. >> same house same call this resolution is
is this -- you can't legislate morality. legislation works on the sane, the law abiding. it doesn't work on criminals -- >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're up for trying it? >> there are monsters out there every day and we need to do something to stop them. >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're worth trying it, correct? >> i want it. that's what i'm proposing. >> let's stipulate you're right. let's say armed guards might work. let's widen the argument a little bit. here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. isn't it possible that if we got rid of these, if we replaced them and said can you only have a magazine that carries five bullets or ten bullets, isn't it just possible we could reduce the carnage in a situation like -- >> i don't believe that's going to make one difference. there are so many ways to evade that. you had that for ten years when dianne feinstein passed that ban in '94, it was on the books. columbine occurred right in the middle of it. it didn't make any difference. i know everyone -- this town wants to argue about gu
changes to india's laws and say women are not safe. the man convicted of stealing the pope's private papers has been pardoned, the pope himself set the man free and cleared him of all charges. the former butler was arrested for leaking some of the secret papers to a author who included them in the book. he can pardon anyone he chooses. not far from the vatican city, a famous roman general's tomb has been found, and the problem is there's no money to do it. we have more. >> reporter: in rome, dig in you are likely to find something very old. for the past six years scientists have been working on this site north of the city. this is where a roman general was buried. he was the inspiration behind the character played by russell crow. but more than a 1,500 years ago, rome fell to the barbarians, and in tpd's age of the euro zone austerity, the tomb is under threat from what some may say are bar barns of another kind, cost cutting accountants and budget slashes officials. >>> the budget to maintain the sites has been cut by at least 20%. as a result, some sites have have been closed and p
existing gun laws are not being enforced. margaret brennan has more on what the group would change and the reaction. >> reporter: the nra is arguing for the creation of a national database of the mentally ill to prevent them from buying weapons. the nra is also lobbying to put armed guards or police in schools. executive vice president wayne la pierre. >> its if's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our schools to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people-- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >> reporter: but the american public is showing a new willingness to tighten gun control laws. in a cbs news poll conducted after the fatal newtown shooting 57% of americans said that gun control laws should be more strict. that's the highest level of support in a decade. and may provide renewed support for politicians willing to challenge the powerful nra lobby. >> new york senator chuck schumer criticized the nra vice president's argument that any attempt at gun restrictions is bound to fail. >> well, i think he
, the laws of egypt definitely forbids this underage marriage. the laws of nigeria forebit this conduct. turned out in fact this was a man, a serial pedophile, gets a younger one. the media scream they're heads off, the women's organizations scream they're head off but that man today, the senator, never prosecuted. on the other hand he claimed, he said anything that the koran says i should do, i will do. anything the koran says i shouldn't do, i won't do. and nowhere does the koran say i cannot marry an underage girl. the laws of two countries are stronger -- superior to the nation's constitution. of course, screams and articles and so on, but important things, until today not been prosecuted. so they have no moral authority to promulgate an edict like this. >> another question here. yes, gentleman six rows back, and thin mirian moorehead. >> thank you, doctors. i feel that we can say the -- one of the things you find around the world, about religion, most countries that actually kept original religion, compared with the development right now, kept their religion or developed far superi
a lot of kids, important note is that in 2008, a law was passed that mra*s sites could not longer be used in kids toys , for right now, if you're buying new toys off the shelf, they're not going to have that particular compound, plus skish shi ones, they're not going to have that, i know you have a small child, is when they're at that mouthing stage of putting everything in their mouth, that maybe be the time to be most concerned about the specifics when they get to the older stage where, you know, there's some pretty nifty plastic toys out there, let's get real, and i like that i had legos as a kid and those were plastic, you know, maybe that's when you loosen it up a little bit and make, you know, judicious decisions, but when they're putting everything in their mouths, you want to be the most careful about what that is, parents may have other added tips. >> [inaudible] because most of the toys for kids, we don't really check sometimes where they're made. >> it's for toys sold in the united states, so regardless of where the manufacturer is, if they're sold in the u.s., they hav
. if there was a gun law that would change the fact that a mentally disturbed man couldn't steal a gun, i would be for it, but the simple fact is, judy, i don't care what law you're going to put in place, the mentally disturbed man is going to steal a gun. >> you can't abolish-- >> he didn't have to steal it, he took it from his mother, what happened in columbine, took them from their parents and the n.r.a., i consider to be a completely utterly destructive organization in this society if they want everybody to have a gun they need to start talking to people how to handle a gun. here is an idea, secure your guns. my brother keeps his guns in a safe. and my father-- fr frnl. >> that's the law. >> are people prosecuted? >> that's a great point. >> and n.r.a. is on this stuff-- i want to nerve what i have to say. i'm tired of hearing how there's this anti-gun agenda. it's an anti-killing spree agenda, it's not an anti-gun agenda. i don't have a problem with guns, i grew up with guns. i have a problem with people having magazines clips, whatever you want to call them and everyone complains we don't
now. thanks, everybody. unions now trying to take their battle over michigan's new right to work law to the ballot box. someone here says that's the vote that could bacfire on our entire job market. you realize that 49 million americans struggle with hunger? that's one out of every 6 americans. these people are around us every day. they're our friends, they're our coworkers, their kids go to school with our kids. sometimes we're not even aware that they're struggling. this problem is closer than you think, but so is the solution. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. >> unions still worked up over michigan's new right to work law. they're trying to get it on the ballot on hope voters will shoot it down. toby says that could have big repercussions everywhere. >> shows 50 years, 10 years, 20 years, right to work states, do not have to pay union dues to work at a company have outperformed in sales growth, job growth and unemployment rate and if you look at the vast example of michigan, let's put it towards indiana where
in the asian average unit. she is a graduate of harvard law school and johns hopkins university. she is a contributing author to consumer credit and landing. welcome to both of you. >> thank you for the opportunity to be here before you today. let me touch on a few highlights of the testimony we have already submitted. we talked a little bit about credit reports and whether consumers understand them or not but the strongest advocate for me is a consumer. when the bank does not know me, 40 million of us moved every year and a credit report is the bridge that tells my story. it is about my hard work and help pay my bills and the good decisions i make and personal responsibility. credit reports are an incredible indicator to others, everything else about you want someone to know about me. usaid, the other banks are so involved and supportive of credit reporting that they are involved in spreading this good news around the world. i serve on an international task force to advance credit reporting and other parts of the world. the system is big. the report laid out very well, 200 million p
to be the safest place of the nuclear storage but under the law they had to get the approval of a local community and so before the decision was made, a survey was done to the residents of this small town in the thrift would you vote to approve this despite the risks 51% said yes and then they asked the second question, a sweetened the deal. they said the parliament chooses your time for the nuclear waste and offers to pay in hot competition for the risk each resident of the town an annual sum of money at the the cut to $8,000 a year then would you accept it and then how many do you think said yes? 90, 80? other guesses it went down from 51% to 25%. the number fell in half. why should this be? why should this be from the standpoint of the standard economic reasoning if you offer people money to do something, the number of people willing to do that should increase. why did it fall in half? what was happening to you think? host >> [inaudible] >> the risk. so if they are being paid money their thinking to themselves this must be riskier than i thought. they are paying the money to do this. well, tha
problems with mexico's strict laws on gun ownership. he was held for attempting to bring a family hair -- heirloom across the border even though he tried to declare. it and there will be a referendum on a new constitution. the muslim brotherhood says the islamist-backed constitution passed with a 64% yes vote. the official results from the last round of voting are expected to be announced tomorrow. former south carolina governor mark sanford is confirming reports that he might run for his old house seat. the one-time rising gop star stepped down as governor two years ago after admitting an affair. his ex-wife jenni sanford is also weighing running for the same house seat. and happy birthday to kolo, the first gorilla born in captivity and the oldest gorilla living in any zoo. she turned 56 and celebrated with a party at the columbus zoo in ohio. we should also wish our regular anchor a happy birthday. she is off for the holiday. there is a picture of her with her presents. >> and shannon is celebrating her 21st birthday. >> that's right. she can finally go and have a beer. >>> as capit
of privileges. whether criminal law or otherwise. other privileges as well. as an office, we were required to be under certain things. but i really touch on areas that i did not have to run my butt by the treasury department in any way shape or form. they weren't happy about the hard truth that i tried to deliver in this book. so it really wasn't -- i really didn't do anything or go in any of those areas. you know, sometimes a little frustrating because there were things i wanted to explore, but i thought it was safer and easier to come nowhere close outline. i felt i could tell the story without having to just go there. so i think that was it. next steps, right now, i'm teaching at nyu school of law. which i am just enjoying and loving. they were so supportive of the process of me writing this book. i'm not sure what's next. but it's been a crazy and wonderful ride. even though i had a hard time in washington in a lot of respects, i would never give back a second of the time. serving the country and went out to do,, i feel blessed and fortunate. working with the amazing men and women who
of government where nobody is above the law. where we have an obligation to hold each other accountable. >> president obama was not only honoring a public servant who inspired him personally, but paying homage to a past or a functional one. a past that is a flash in the rear-view mirror of this congress because this is the congress of today. >> as you know, the house did not take up the tax bill last night because we didn't have the votes to pass it. it's not the outcome that i wanted. that was the will of the house. >> it was the will of the house to do nothing? on thursday night, the members of the elected house of representatives decided it would you describe not their will to take a vote on their own leadership's proposal. it would have exempted the first million dollars of income from a tax increase. there was no chance of being passed into law as the president made clear he would veto it. if the speaker's plan b passed the democrat controlled senate. this was a republican proposal. house democrats would not have supported it. democrats couldn't agree to vote on it. instead, they w
this legislation the civil rights act of 64 and 65 were enacted into law. >> host: at what point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> guest: i became aware when i was in a graduate program at the university. someone came and asked me if i would work on a project they had. post the 60s, 70s? >> guest: yet, and i used some of the reports gazeta reports they did were very good reports and some historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally, by the time that roofie wade was decided, the commission asked me if i would write something as a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out in what the history had had other way back to england and so on and i did a report for them. >> host: what is your history? where are you from? >> guest: i am from nashville, tennessee. my family and relatives are all still there. i went to pearl high school and i went to howard university and then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where he got a phd and then i went to the law school. i wanted to do legal histor
walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't want a recall. he was an inspiration for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking p
. is a provision that bans on lawful assembly. a large number of police along with the paramilitary have been deployed. nothing seems to deter these protesters. >> the situation is very fluid. they're trying to get the government. they have been blocking the road, and during signature campaign down the road. it demands the immediate justice for the victims. >> the protests soon turned violent after demonstrators fought police as they tried to break the barricade. police have used tear gas and water cannons to disperse the crowds. they are demanding more actions from the government. >> this is a new generation. a new generation were every youth is not over from by the powers that be. they have taken to the streets. >> as the victim fights for her life, her supporters continue to fight for justice on the streets. al jazeera, a new delhi. >> and north of the country a journalist covering a protest against the tape of an actress has been shot dead. he was killed when police opened fire on demonstrators. a local film star alleged she was sexually assaulted last week by a member of the separatist g
this is putting the law in place and geek getting the mechanism to secure infrastructure financing proceeds and a lot of credit goes to bran son and many of my preed says cor and is monique moyer that has gotten us to this point and right now we are looking to the establish a policy with the board of supervisors that gives us a -- to support this before looking at any particular project. we have present proposed policy to the capital planning committee on november 19th and we will go back for action this month and we are looking to the bring the city policy to the board of interferes in early 2013 and so as brad said i'll go over the policy and then brad will go over three major projects that we are proposing the use of i f d for. and so the port commission is very well aware in 1969, we got our 54 piers nine react activated and we have an extraordinarily large deferred maintenance problem in the magnitude of $2.2 million and what the port earned as an enterprise is not enough to deal with the assets and the defined problems and so one of our major strategies that the port has initiated i
complicate federal state and local laws on the effectiveness of the governance of the agency and it will look all the financial over site and controls and status of implementations and prior recommendation and is other prior audits and recommendation that is have been made and i would also look at the other management and public housing resource and is including housing provided by section eight voucher and is as well as housing managed by other agencies and nonprofit corporation and is it will also look at the management and the ofl performance of agency personnel and we will look at how this agency compares in terms of best practices with other agencies not on in the region but nationally and so i want to thank the following members of the board for their co sponsorship. supervisor avalos, supervisor mar and supervisor a wonk walky. and the last point that i would make because i was pope hoping that is something that would be ri solved by the time we got to our last board meeting much has been set said in the press about charlie the doing that attacked a horse in a doing bleach area and i
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
is standing tough in opposition to new gun laws after the newtown massacre. the ceo went on tv today to defend his call for armed guards in every u.s. school. cnn's barbara starr tells us what he said and how people in high places of power are reacting to it. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> how many more? >> reporter: performers and artists now joining with 800 mayors calling for a plan to end gun violence. but wayne lapierre, the chief executive officer and public face of the national rifle association, made clear on nbc's "meet the press" that his organization will oppose legislation adding new restrictions to the sale of weapons or high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> look, i know there's a media machine in this country that wants to blame guns every time something happensism know there's an anti-second amendment industry in this town. i know there's political leads that for 20 years always try to say it is because americans own guns. i'm telling you what i think will make people safe. and what every mom and dad will make them better, they drop their kid off at school i
is that we have a patchwork of privacy laws. there are some very strong laws related to what you can do and what you can. we don't have a strong laws related to consumers and these types of devices. you are right. people are signing away a lot of privacy, including their image and who they are and what they are doing in their home. this is a very different type of invasion than we saw before. >> these are the kind of flavors you just signed to do things like instagram. >> nobody reads them. or you rare read read them through. and then you have the instagram situation. saying they might sell your photographs as an appetizer? >> i think that people think about the images and they have a very different type of reaction. think about those new airport systems in which you get an image going through the safety. all the uproar that happen for that. there is no national security issue about who is playing xbox or who is watching tv in my living room. >> if you are agreeing to these things, you are signing away your privacy, right? >> absolutely. >> when she done not, is there a way to get it ba
receiving gifts. >> i said i cannot take a present. it is against the law and they said well, open the box and take a look at it. out comes this little paget watch and on the back they have for dean, we love you, the sinatras. you can't give it back to us. >> after writing this letter to fbi director jay edgar hoover, elson was allowed to keep the watch. the day after sinatra's birthday the case was cracked wide open when john irwin con phelpsed involvement to his brother who alerted the fbi. within hours keenan and ansler were also in custody. >> three men were arrested including barry keenan a 23-year-old unemployed salesman. most of the money all in small bills was recovered. >> despite having given keenan money for the plat, dean torrance was never charged. when the trial began in february of 1964 the defense took the strategy of blaming the victims to dizzying new heights. >> it was keenan who devised their defense. >> every time i talked to a lawyer it was are you sure this is not a publicity stunt. everybody was sure it was a publicity stunt. that gave me the idea. >> all three had
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